Managing the advanced cancer patient in the Australian emergency department environment: findings from a national survey of emergency department clinicians.

Weiland TJ, Lane H, Jelinek GA, et al.
Aim/Abstract: Delivery of care to people with advanced cancer in the emergency department (ED) is complicated by competing service demands, workloads and physical design constraints. We explored emergency clinicians’ attitudes to the ED environment when caring for patients who present with advanced cancer, and how these attitudes are affected by access to palliative care services, palliative care education, staff type, ED experience and patient demographic, hospital type and region.

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Care of the dying cancer patient in the emergency department: findings from a National survey of Australian emergency department clinicians.

Lane H, Weil J, Jelinek GA et al

Aim/Abstract: Over the course of their illness, a person with cancer is likely to see a number of different healthcare professionals, including those in the emergency department (ED). There is limited research examining the interaction and communication between the involved healthcare professionals when such a patient presents to the ED. This study aimed to explore the views and experiences of interdisciplinary interactions of healthcare professionals caring for patients with advanced cancer who present to the ED.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24287504

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Ideal care and the realities of practice: interdisciplinary relationships in the management of advanced cancer patients in Australian emergency departments

Lane H, Weil J, Jelinek GA et al

Aim/Abstract: Over the course of their illness, a person with cancer is likely to see a number of different healthcare professionals, including those in the emergency department (ED). There is limited research examining the interaction and communication between the involved healthcare professionals when such a patient presents to the ED. This study aimed to explore the views and experiences of interdisciplinary interactions of healthcare professionals caring for patients with advanced cancer who present to the ED.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24287504

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“Better pathways of care”: suggested improvements to the emergency department management of people with advanced cancer.

Jelinek GA, Boughey M, Marck CH, et al

Aim/Abstract: It is difficult to provide optimal care to people with advanced cancer presenting to emergency departments (EDs). Recent data suggest that the ED environment, the skills and priorities of treating staff, and the lack of clear communication related to goals of care contribute to the difficulty. By exploring the views of emergency, palliative care (PC), and oncology clinicians on the care of these patients, this study aimed to describe potential solutions.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25058985

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Donation after cardiac death: are Australian emergency clinicians supportive?

Marck CH, Neate SL, Weiland TJ et al

Aim/Abstract: To improve organ donation processes and outcomes, many Australian hospitals have introduced donation after cardiac death (DCD) following the 2010 publication of the National Protocol for DCD. As emergency clinicians play a significant role in identifying potential DCD donors, it is critical to assess their support and knowledge. Although many support DCD, most are unaware of the protocol or procedures regarding DCD. Education is needed and desired by many emergency clinicians.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23841760

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Study of Occupational Violence in Australian Emergency Departments

 Griffiths D, Morphet J, Plummer V et al
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