A review of the use of Medication Standing Orders in Australian EDs

Morrow M, Patel B, Pache Dr D

Aims/Objectives:

The aim of this study is to review the current practice regarding the development, use and application of
medication standing orders in Australian Emergency Departments. The study involves two surveys, one of which
aims to explore nursing staff use and opinions of Medication Standing Orders in their Emergency Department.
In particular, we are hoping to gather information about:
• Your understanding of the definition of a medication standing order;
• Your frequency of use of individual medication standing orders;
• Your knowledge and confidence of use of medication standing orders; and
• The type of organisational support of use of medication standing orders

Download Information Sheet for this Study

South Australian ED clinical staff experiences of an extreme weather event

Hammad K, Wake M, Zampatti C, Newmann S

Aims/Objectives:

The aim of this study is to try and determine how the extreme weather events impacted South Australian emergency department staff. We would like to know what worked, what didn’t work and what we can learn from this event that might help us better prepare for future major incident or disaster events. If you would like to participate please click on the link to complete a survey on your experience

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Emergency nurses’ professional quality of life and professional conduct during nurse-patient interactions

Jacqueline Ingram, Associate Professor Dr. Trudy Dwyer, Professor Dr. Kerry Reid-Searl, Associate Professor Dr. Tania Signal,

Aims/Objectives:

The primary aim of the current research is to explore if/how emergency nurses’ professional quality of life is related to their professional conduct towards patients.  The secondary aim is to explore emergency nurses’ own perception and understanding of professional quality of life and it’s impact upon their professional conduct towards patients.

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Psychosocial Care for Injured Children: Worldwide Survey among Hospital Emergency Department Staff

Eva Alisic, PhD , Claire Hoysted, BSc(Hons) , Nancy Kassam-Adams, PhD et al.

Aim/Abstract:  Examines emergency department (ED) staff’s knowledge of traumatic stress in children, attitudes toward providing psychosocial care, and confidence in doing so, and also to examine differences in these outcomes according to demographic, professional, and organizational characteristics, and training preferences.

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Managing the advanced cancer patient in the Australian emergency department environment: findings from a national survey of emergency department clinicians.

Weiland TJ, Lane H, Jelinek GA, et al.
Aim/Abstract: Delivery of care to people with advanced cancer in the emergency department (ED) is complicated by competing service demands, workloads and physical design constraints. We explored emergency clinicians’ attitudes to the ED environment when caring for patients who present with advanced cancer, and how these attitudes are affected by access to palliative care services, palliative care education, staff type, ED experience and patient demographic, hospital type and region.

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Care of the dying cancer patient in the emergency department: findings from a National survey of Australian emergency department clinicians.

Lane H, Weil J, Jelinek GA et al

Aim/Abstract: Over the course of their illness, a person with cancer is likely to see a number of different healthcare professionals, including those in the emergency department (ED). There is limited research examining the interaction and communication between the involved healthcare professionals when such a patient presents to the ED. This study aimed to explore the views and experiences of interdisciplinary interactions of healthcare professionals caring for patients with advanced cancer who present to the ED.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24287504

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Ideal care and the realities of practice: interdisciplinary relationships in the management of advanced cancer patients in Australian emergency departments

Lane H, Weil J, Jelinek GA et al

Aim/Abstract: Over the course of their illness, a person with cancer is likely to see a number of different healthcare professionals, including those in the emergency department (ED). There is limited research examining the interaction and communication between the involved healthcare professionals when such a patient presents to the ED. This study aimed to explore the views and experiences of interdisciplinary interactions of healthcare professionals caring for patients with advanced cancer who present to the ED.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24287504

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